We’re adapting our judging processes for the ‘new normal’ in 2020-2021, moving all SBC project judging online. Between March 22 and April 16, you’ll schedule a 25-minute slot to present your project by videoconference to a panel of three local judges. Questions and answers will be done live in your private session.


EVALUATION PROCESS

Via videoconference, each SBC student/group will present to a panel of three (3) judges for 15 minutes followed by a 10-minute Q&A session. Evaluation slots will be scheduled in advance depending on the availability of local judges, and students will have to reserve their slot through their personal SBC Registration Profile. Judging will take place from March 22 to April 18, 2021. Each judge will be expected to evaluate at least 7 projects in their region.

Once all evaluation periods have been completed for that region, judges will be convened in a videoconference call to discuss their scoring results and determine the winning projects for that region. A virtual awards ceremony for regional competitions would take place at the end of the first day of the virtual competition on April 26.

For the National Final, a second judging session will be scheduled for all Regional Winners on the morning of April 27. The format of this second judging session is the same as for the regional competitions. The final National winners will be announced in our awards ceremony at the end of the April 27 virtual event.

Interested in becoming a judge?

Because of the high level of science at SBC competitions, our judging panels are made up of profession researchers, university faculty, graduate-level students and industry representatives. SBC projects fall within the area of biotechnology or health sciences, including but not limited to the following fields:

  • Healthcare and medicine;
  • Agriculture and agri-food;
  • Forestry and mining;
  • Food processing;
  • Environmental science and climatology;
  • Biochemistry;
  • Molecular biology;
  • Cellular biology;
  • Genomics;
  • Microbiology.

If you have a strong scientific background in research, biotechnology or health sciences, and can spare the time to evaluate projects, please contact us to join the team.

Frequently Asked Questions:
  • What’s the standard profile of a judge, and do they need expertise in specific areas?
    Judges typically work in any area of chemistry, biology or biotechnology and can be industry researchers, university faculty/researchers or PhD students. The most important skill set is familiarity in doing research.
  • Do judges get assigned to particular projects based on their expertise?
    No, any judge could do any / all projects
  • Language requirements?
    Ideally, judges in Montreal and Ottawa should be bilingual (English and French) as there are both Francophone and Anglophone competitors.
JUDGING CRITERIA

At each Sanofi Biogenius Canada (SBC) regional competition, an expert panel of volunteer judges selects the top three projects (individual & group) using criteria as outlined below. Students are not only evaluated on the quality of their research, their lab journal – in the case of experimental projects – and their poster display, but are also questioned on their scientific knowledge as well as potential real-world applications of their research.

For the 2020-2021 edition, Sanofi Biogenius Canada has implemented separate judging criteria for experimental projects and literature review/study projects. Consult the criteria below.

EXPERIMENTAL PROJECTS

Originality and Scientific Merit – 30%

Evaluation of the project’s overall relevance to the life sciences, as well as the degree of originality and creativity demonstrated by the participant. Critical to this will be an assessment of the extent to which the ideas have been generated by the students themselves. Judges must also consider the level of science represented by the project, and if it meets or exceeds the students’ current grade level.

  • Relevance to Biotechnology (Life Sciences) – 10%
  • Originality and innovation – 15%
  • Level of science – 5%
Project Execution – 30%

Evaluation of the project’s experimental design, protocols, data collection and analysis. The students’ command of techniques and skills must be assessed along with the validity of their conclusions.

  • Experimental design and protocols – 10%
  • Results: Data collection and analysis – 10%
  • Command of techniques and skills – 5%
  • Validity of conclusions – 5%
Communication (Poster and Oral Presentation) – 40%

Project Display: Evaluation of the display as a summary of the project and its conclusions. Judges will look at the display in terms of its layout and clarity in illustrating the scientific techniques involved in the research. Need help preparing your poster? We have a page for that.

  • Project Summary – 5%
  • Clarity and layout – 5%

Oral Presentation and Lab Journal: assessment of the students’ oral presentation in terms of the level of scientific knowledge demonstrated and their ability to explain and defend their conclusions. Evaluation of the lab journal for completeness and chronological record of the research progress. Not sure what a lab journal looks like? Here’s a checklist on what to include.

  • Demonstration of scientific knowledge – 10%
  • Ability to explain and defend conclusions – 10%
  • Lab journal – 10%

LITERATURE REVIEW / STUDY PROJECTS

Originality and Scientific Merit – 30%

Evaluation of the project’s overall relevance to the life sciences, as well as the degree of originality and creativity demonstrated by the participant. Critical to this will be an assessment of the extent to which the ideas have been generated by the students themselves. Judges must also consider the level of science represented by the project, and if it meets or exceeds the students’ current grade level.

  • Relevance to Biotechnology (Life Sciences) – 10%
  • Originality and innovation – 15%
  • Level of science – 5%
Project Execution – 40%

Evaluation of the collection and analysis of previously published scientific data, the organization of findings in a clear and comprehensive way, and the synthesis and comparison of the findings to reveal evidence of a fact or situation of scientific interest.

Problem / Hypothesis – 10%

  • Existing knowledge and background research were integrated into the formation of the problem/objective – 5%
  • The objective was clearly stated and provided direction and appropriate scope for the project – 5%

Methodology – 15%

  • The information acquired showed depth and variety – 5%
  • The data gathered were reliable, comprehensive, well-organized and appropriate (multiple independent sources were used and verified) – 5%
  • The student explained/recorded progress of the project, including research notes, resources, and discussions – 5%

Analysis / Conclusions – 15%

  • Key scientific concepts, including alternate viewpoints, of the research topic were identified and explored – 5%
  • Critical analysis/interpretation of research material was presented (e.g., comparison of sources, surveys, and statistics) – 5%
  • Logical conclusions based on the research were reached – 5%
Communication (Poster and Oral Presentation) – 30%

Project Display: Evaluation of the display as a summary of the project and its conclusions. Judges will look at the display in terms of its layout and clarity in illustrating the scientific techniques involved in the research. Need help preparing your poster? We have a page for that.

  • Project Summary – 5%
  • Clarity and layout – 5%

Oral Presentation: assessment of the students’ oral presentation in terms of the level of scientific knowledge demonstrated and their ability to explain and defend their conclusions.

  • Demonstration of scientific knowledge – 10%
  • Ability to explain and defend conclusions – 10%

JUDGE ORIENTATION AND TRAINING

Since all judging will take place virtually, the tallying of judges scores will be managed by the SBC Registration System. To give a quick overview of how the system works, volunteer judges are required to complete an online training session. A recording of the March 18 judge orientation is available below.

Additional Reference Documents
For further reference, you can download and view the orientation training deck, as well as worksheets of the two judging rubriques. Please recall that all official student scoring is completed online; paper copies are no longer accepted for student scoring.

Access to SBC Online Judging System
Judges also receive a personalized invitation from our online system to create your online Judge Profile. The input of student scores and comments will be exclusively through this system. If you are a volunteer judge and do not receive this email by March 19, please contact us.